Friday, January 13, 2017

President-elect Donald Trump Considers Forming New Committee on Vaccines


We have previously written about how President-elect Donald Trump feels about vaccines. He isn’t against vaccines completely, but he is interested in changing the way vaccines are delivered in such large amounts over a short period. Now, he’s looking at forming a committee to consider vaccine programs, and he has the medical community worried.
Robert F. Kennedy Jr. met with Trump at Trump Tower in New York on Tuesday and told reporters that he had agreed to lead the effort, whatever form it takes. Too many doctors around the world, there is nothing left which needs to be debated about, with the American Academy of Pediatrics releasing this statement “Vaccines are safe. Vaccines are effective. Vaccines save lives.”
Robert F. Kennedy Jr. is a documented vaccine skeptic who has long held concerns about the use of thimerosal in vaccines because it contains a form of mercury that he has called “a devastating brain poison.” He said to reporters after the meeting “President-elect Trump has some doubts about the current vaccine policies and he has questions about it,” Kennedy said, adding that “we ought to be debating the science.”
To many pediatricians around the world, there’s nothing left to debate, and the vaccine program has been one of the most effective ways humans have controlled diseases. “Vaccines have been part of the fabric of our society for decades and are the most significant medical innovation of our time,” Drs. Fernando Stein and Karen Remley of the American Academy of Pediatrics said in a statement on Tuesday.
There have been some very in-depth and detailed studies around the world into thimerosal in vaccinations, with no links to autism discovered. In many vaccinations, the preservative has been completely removed from most vaccinations. People can choose to have thimerosal-free vaccinations if they are still concerned.
“The science has spoken. Thimerosal is a dead issue,” said Dr. Paul Offit, a vaccine researcher at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and a very vocal critic of anti-vaccine groups.
Many studies have proven that there is no direct link between vaccinations and autism in children and that a number of vaccinations children receive in one dose could be harmful. If you enjoyed the blog and would like to read more, then don’t forget to follow and share!
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Thursday, January 5, 2017

#GFCF Peanut Butter and Jelly Cookies

Easy to make and tasty for all!

Ingredients
  • 1 cup of peanut butter 
  • 1 cup of white sugar 
  • 1 egg 
  • 1 teaspoon of vanilla extract 
  • 2 tablespoons of your favorite jelly 

Directions
  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees 
  2. Mix the peanut butter, sugar, egg and vanilla. 
  3. Put teaspoon size balls on a cookie sheet. 
  4. Make a criss-cross pattern on each with a fork. 
  5. Make a small divot in the middle of each with your finger and fill it with jelly.
  6. Bake them for about 10 minutes and let cool on the cookie sheet for a couple of minutes before moving them to a cooling rack.